Isaac Meyer

Historian, teacher, podcaster

Tag: bakufu

Episode 302 – Stand Up For Your Rights, Part 2

This week, we take a look at the peasant uprisings in Aizu domain in 1868 to continue our exploration of the question: where were all the peasants in the Meiji Restoration?

Sources

Vlastos, Stephen. Peasant Protests and Uprisings in Tokugawa Japan

Pratt, Edward. Japan’s Protoindustrial Elite: The Economic Foundations of the Gounou

Bowen, Rodger. Rebellion and Democracy in Meiji Japan

Magagna, Victor V. Communities of Grain: Rural Rebellion in Comparative Perspective

Images

Wakamatsu Castle, the fortress of the lords of Aizu.

The siege of Wakamatsu castle saw the fall of Aizu domain, but the peasants of Aizu did little to defend their former masters.

Yonaoshi uprisings were not just confined to Aizu. Many, like the one depicted here, began with the destruction of the property of the wealthy and powerful, especially wealthy peasants.

 

 

Episode 301 – Stand Up For Your Rights, Part 1

While the Meiji Restoration was going on, where was everybody else? We’ll start trying to answer that question today with a look at an uprising in 1866 in the region of Shindatsu.

Sources

Vlastos, Stephen. Peasant Protests and Uprisings in Tokugawa Japan

Pratt, Edward. Japan’s Protoindustrial Elite: The Economic Foundations of the Gounou

Vanoverbeke, Dimitri. Community and State in the Japanese Farm Village

Images

Itakura Katsusato later in life. He is supposed to have promised relief to the peasants of Shindatsu, but was overruled.

The former site of the Daikansho (bakufu intendant’s office) in Koori, where the Shindatsu rebels eventually made their way.

Shindatsu, sometimes today called the Fukushima basin. You can see how well irrigated it is; perfect for silk.

A map of the region from Stephen Vlastos’s book (see the notes).

Episode 9 – Pax Tokugawa

This week we will be discussing the social and political structure of Edo Japan. I know, that doesn’t sound like a super-exciting topic off the bat, but I promise there’s some fun stuff there. For example, this week we get to learn about how one shogun would force Dutch traders to do wacky things for his amusement!

Listen to the episode here.

Sources

Jansen, The Making of Modern Japan.

Hanley, Susan. Everyday Things in Premodern Japan: The Hidden Legacy of Material Culture. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.

Images (Courtesy of the Wikimedia Foundation)

This is a view of the old palace of the Tokugawa shoguns in modern Tokyo. After the fall of the shogunate it was taken over by the Imperial family, and is today known as the Tokyo Imperial Palace.

This is a view of the old palace of the Tokugawa shoguns in modern Tokyo. After the fall of the shogunate it was taken over by the Imperial family, and is today known as the Tokyo Imperial Palace.

A group of daimyo going to attend to the shogun as part of their duties under the sankin kotai system.

A group of daimyo going to attend to the shogun as part of their duties under the sankin kotai system.

This is a sketch by Englebert Kaempfer of a daimyo's procession going to Edo. Kaempfer, as head of the Dutch mission in Nagasaki, would have to go to Edo on a semi-regular basis in a similar procession (much like a daimyo would).

This is a sketch by Englebert Kaempfer of a daimyo’s procession going to Edo. Kaempfer, as head of the Dutch mission in Nagasaki, would have to go to Edo on a semi-regular basis in a similar procession (much like a daimyo would).

Tokugawa Tsunayoshi, a.k.a. Mr. "Wouldn't it be funny if we had those Dutch guys make out?"

Tokugawa Tsunayoshi, a.k.a. Mr. “Wouldn’t it be funny if we had those Dutch guys make out?”

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