In the last major land battle of the Russo-Japanese War, two great powers enter and…two great powers leave? Wait, I’m confused. How are the Japanese winning every battle and still not winning the war?

Listen to the episode here.

Sources

Drea, Edward. Japan’s Imperial Army: Its Rise and Fall, 1853-1945. 

Nish, Ian. The Russo-Japanese War, 1904-05.

Wolff, David et al. World War Zero: The Russo-Japanese War in Global Perspective.

Images

499_001

The Russo-Japanese War was big news around the world. This Italian magazine carried front page coverage of the Battle of Sandepu.

shtakelberg_g-k

Georgii Stackelberg, the Russian general whose gloryhound tendencies resulted in him leaking the planned Russian attack on Sandepu to the press in hopes of getting credit for it.

russian_field_gun_during_the_battle_of_mukden

Russian field guns in operation at Mukden.

300px-mukden_japanese_assault_french_papier

A postcard showing Japanese troops storming the ramparts of the Russian defenses. In practice, these kind of massed ranks of troops were very uncommon — charging forward in such a formation was functionally suicidal. However, older romantic notions of what an infantry assault looked like still held firm in many quarters.

retreat_of_the_russian_army_after_the_battle_of_mukden

Russian forces retreat towards Harbin after the battle.

bulla019

Russian field medics treat an injured soldier. About 1/3 of the Russian force at Mukden was killed, wounded, or captured.