Isaac Meyer

Historian, teacher, podcaster

Episode 47 – The Emperor’s Own, Part 3

This week, we’ll continue with our story of the rise of Japan’s military to power; after the crushing of Russia in 1905, the army and navy will lose power and influence to the civilian government as political parties rise to prominence. However, storm clouds gather on the horizon as World War I convinces some military leaders of the necessity of a military state and antagonism between the armed forces and the civilian leadership grows.

Listen to the episode here.

Sources

Drea, Edward. Japan’s Imperial Army: Its Rise and Fall, 1853-1945.

Jansen, Marius. The Making of Modern Japan.

Pyle, Kenneth. Japan Rising.

Images (Courtesy of the Wikimedia Foundation)

The Russian Army in retreat after the Battle of Mukden.

The Russian Army in retreat after the Battle of Mukden.

Japanese troops moving through Seoul in 1904 on their way to Manchuria to fight Russia.

Japanese troops moving through Seoul in 1904 on their way to Manchuria to fight Russia.

The Hibiya Riots of 1905. Protesters flooded the streets to speak against the terms of the Treaty of Portsmouth, which was seen as insufficient in light of Japanese losses.

The Hibiya Riots of 1905. Protesters flooded the streets to speak against the terms of the Treaty of Portsmouth, which was seen as insufficient in light of Japanese losses.

Saionji Kinmochi, the Prime Minister forced from office by the Army in 1912 in response to his attempts to restrain their spending.

Saionji Kinmochi, the Prime Minister forced from office by the Army in 1912 in response to his attempts to restrain their spending.

Yamamoto Gonnohyoe (sometimes his first name is given as Gonbei). He brought the military back under control in 1913 and restricted its ability to influence policy, despite being a former military man himself (he was a retired Admiral).

Yamamoto Gonnohyoe (sometimes his first name is given as Gonbei). He brought the military back under control in 1913 and restricted its ability to influence policy, despite being a former military man himself (he was a retired Admiral).

Frank Kellogg, US Secretary of State and one of the minds behind the Paris Peace Pact (Kellogg-Briand Pact).

Frank Kellogg, US Secretary of State and one of the minds behind the Paris Peace Pact (Kellogg-Briand Pact).

French Minister of Foreign Affairs Aristide Briand, one of the thinkers behind the Kellogg-Briand Pact. After World War II, the pact would provide the intellectual inspiration for many other agreements to restrict or end war, including the UN Charter.

French Minister of Foreign Affairs Aristide Briand, one of the thinkers behind the Kellogg-Briand Pact. After World War II, the pact would provide the intellectual inspiration for many other agreements to restrict or end war, including the UN Charter.

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Episode 46 – The Emperor’s Own, Part 2

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Episode 48 – The Emperor’s Own, Part 4

1 Comment

  1. Love the podcast, but I cringed when you said the Taishou emperor was “basically crazy” 😵!

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